How to fix plantar fasciitis in five steps

Best defense against sports injuries is your mind. Hi folks, welcome!

FitOldDog's rollers

FitOldDog’s roller gear, including his favorite TriggerPoint Performance Roller, which has nearly fixed his plantar fasciitis in 6 days, following careful diagnosis of the underlying biomechanics. Photo by FitOldDog.

One week ago, I told my movement and dance teacher (not that I like to dance, I just want to move freely into late old age – I’m a sprightly 71, right now), Rebecca, that I had managed to induce a severe case of plantar fasciitis heel pain in my left foot, by changing my running shoes, only one month before my next Ironman race, and she said, “Great, we can demonstrate that our method really works.” I recently reported on this blog that my return to mild arch supports in those shoes seemed to have fixed my chronically tight right calf, which was preventing me from running.

FitOldDog's finish time for the Boston Marathon 2009

Still proud of qualifying for the Boston Marathon after fixing a persistent case of plantar fasciitis. Life is a trip, but you have to grab it by the balls!

The author completes Lake Placid Ironman 2011 with the aid of his Cook Zenith stent graft.

The author completes Lake Placid Ironman 2011 with the aid of his Cook Zenith stent graft. Only person in the world to complete an Ironman with an AAA stent graft. Click image for brief video of this finish.

This is a big deal for an Ironman-distance triathlete, and especially one who sells a plantar fasciitis treatment method e-book. The problem was that one morning, two days after I started using these arch supports again, only running a couple of miles a couple of times, I jumped out of bed to that stabbing heel pain of plantar fasciitis. In my left foot, if you’ll believe it, where it has never been a problem. Last time that happened, in my right foot, it took me almost a year to fix it, just in time to qualify for the Boston Marathon. I had finally settled, with great success, on a TriggerPoint Performance roller, on the advice of my eldest son, Nick, a devotee of intermittent fasting. So, this time, I immediately started to apply our 5-step plantar fasciitis treatment method, which you can find at Limberfeet.com. Today, about one week later, the morning heel pain is gone, while running only slightly aggravated the problem. I enjoyed the best run in months this morning (no tight right calf, no tight left heel). The trick is to apply our method systematically, and remember the comment of one of the reviewers of our method, ‘Saunch09,’ on the Amazon Website: “I stopped thinking about it as a “foot” problem and started thinking about it as an issue with the muscles above and connecting to my foot. Whenever it rears its ugly head and I work on those muscles it is quickly nipped in the bud.” The only suggested change I would make to this kind comment is to substitute for ‘muscles’ the myo-neuro-fascial-system. Cheers, Kevin aka FitOldDogImportant Note: These posts do not provide medical advice. You should always consult your physician before undertaking or significantly modifying an exercise program.

Copyright © 2010 Kevin T. Morgan aka FitOldDog, Old Dogs in Training, LLC.

Post Footer automatically generated by wp-posturl plugin for wordpress.

Posted in injury, Older Athlete, plantar fasciitis, Running | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Hey! Boomers, Get Your Senior Pass For The National Parks, A Great Advantage Of Aging!

FitOldDog with Lori of the National Parks service, with FitOldDog's senior pass.

Lori made my friends and I feel very welcome, as we all came into the Shenandoah National Park for a hike. Get your Senior Pass, it really works, for friends, family, and your vehicle. Selfie by FitOldDog.

Hi folks, welcome,

FitOldDog's friends in the Shenandoah National Park

Yep, they all came in with me on my Senior Pass. Nick, Willbe, Myles, Deb, Felix and Darian. Photo by FitOldDog, in the Shenandoah National Park.

Aging can be a bummer, but there are some advantages, such as the National Parks Senior Pass. It costs $10, but it lasts for life (so stay in shape for full value). I got mine a few years ago, and the parks staff are always welcoming and friendly, explaining all the great benefits of your card. Including the fact that everyone in your vehicle can come in for free, too. You also get to park your vehicle gratis at the trailheads.

While my friends are hiking the trail, I’ll drive ahead to have a run, if I can get my plantar fasciitis to settle down, which I’m sure I shall - brought my roller! Then I’ll set up my old Coleman stove (now 47 years old), and get dinner ready, before we set camp for the night.

So, instead of complaining about old age, try finding those great advantages, and exercise to reap the full benefits.

Cheers,

Kevin aka FitOldDog

 Important Note: These posts do not provide medical advice. You should always consult your physician before undertaking or significantly modifying an exercise program.

Copyright © 2010 Kevin T. Morgan aka FitOldDog, Old Dogs in Training, LLC.

Post Footer automatically generated by wp-posturl plugin for wordpress.

Posted in aging, Older Athlete | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

As You Approach Old Age, Are You More Driven By Fear Or Inspiration? It’s Your Choice!

Angel's Landing Sign

Deb frightened me to death, when she scaled Angel’s Landing, as it was getting dark, raining, and with a >800 feet drop on either side of a narrow peak. I couldn’t get close, being frozen by fear.

“The Only Thing We Have to Fear Is Fear Itself”: FDR’s First Inaugural Address” History Matters.

Hi folks, welcome!

I’m scared of heights and poverty, I don’t seem to be anxious about aging or dying, particularly, but I am frightened of  not living my life to the full, which can be a living death and a terrible waste.

Path in Zion National Park

This path in Zion National Park, running along a cliff edge (somewhere between 200 and 800 feet high), scared the crap out of me, causing me to freeze, clutch the wall, try to hide in the corner of the path against the cliff, and generally look like a weeny. Photo by FitOldDog.

From time to time I reflect on the role that fear plays in my life, and Brian Germain’s excellent book on the subject, Transcending Fear, Battling The Enemy Within, which I am currently rereading. Why am I rereading it? Because I started to lose some sleep due to concerns about the success of my business attempts, and the issue of money, which right now is not an urgent problem, but it could be. Isn’t that where fear generally derives, from our minds saying, “Watch out, it could be!”

You might think that alcohol makes us stupid, but in my case, with respect to acrophobia in The Grand Canyon, a single whisky, taken to combat cold, completely eliminated my fear of heights, whilst (while, sorry!!!) leaving me in sufficient control of my actions to not do anything unwise along the high altitude visitors paths. Dutch Courage! 

Alcohol can make us stupid, but so can fear!

Wine posters

I tried to take myself into this same fearless place the next day, by willpower alone, with a little success.

I know that it is within my control – the only solution, I suspect, is to take on the fear and go to high places. It is only fear that holds me back from enjoying some of the grandest scenery that the world has to offer, and from parachuting, for that matter.

This all makes me wonder if fear is holding me back in my attempts to become a businessman. It’s worth exploring, I think.

Is fear holding you back from the dreams of a lifetime?

Cheers,

FitOldDog

Quote in Brian Germain's book on fear.

 Important Note: These posts do not provide medical advice. You should always consult your physician before undertaking or significantly modifying an exercise program.

Copyright © 2010 Kevin T. Morgan aka FitOldDog, Old Dogs in Training, LLC.

Post Footer automatically generated by wp-posturl plugin for wordpress.

Posted in aging, inspiration, motivation, psychology | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Repiphanies, Arch Supports, And FitOldDog’s Journey To Barefoot Running And Back Again

Born to run, book

I love that book, but I’m not a Tarahumara Indian or a Kenyan, I’m a swimmer.

Hi folks, welcome!

Just because you can’t handle barefoot running, does not mean that you can’t use it as a carefully titrated component of your arch (thus your running) training.

Karen, Feldenkrais instructor, with Mr. Bones and AAA stent graft.

If I absolutely need my AAA stent graft, Rupert, for survival (a crutch), then I guess arch supports, for me, fall into the same category, essential crutches. Makes me feel like Tiny Tim, a really irritating Dickens character. Photo by FitOldDog.

I really don’t like using arch supports for running, as I consider them to be a crutch, but it would appear, that for now at least, I’m forced to do so!

Ever since my interest in barefoot running, and increasing the effectiveness of my arches as I run, I’ve struggled with calf tightness and sore foot tendons. Having an abdominal aortic aneurysm, I probably suffer from some kind of genetic connective tissue disorder. Such a disorder may account for my failure, after a great deal of careful work, to undertake barefoot running for any length of time, even on sand and grass – but it feels like floating on air!

Arch supportsFor several years, I’ve worked to run endurance races in minimalist shoes – which also feels like floating on air – but every time I develop calf and foot pain and tightness.

Then a few days ago, Deb said, “Kevin, you never complained about calf problems when you had those arch supports in your shoes, you even qualified for Boston. You’re not Kenyan, and you’re not built like a runner, more like a swimmer, so why don’t you go back to arch supports?

I did, reluctantly, and the calf issue is melting away! Bummer! A good bummer!

Deb with FitOldDog's Guru bike

I guess I need to consider it more as getting my gear to fit, rather than a crutch? This bike really fits, to the point that it forget that it is there. Photo of wonderful Deb with my great Guru. Photo by FitOldDog.

A repeated epiphany, or repiphany, in the form of FitOldDog had better continue to use his arch supports.

I’m not the first casualty of barefoot running thinking, even though strong arches are critical for low impact running. I suspect that a number of things will determine one’s success in this arena, including:

1. Body weight.

2. Genetics.

3. Whether you ran barefoot as a kid (I couldn’t in the city).

4. How carefully you approach the process.

5. Running technique.

[addendum from Marsha, with thanks from FitOldDog:

#6 Age. Face up to the fact that your tissues aren’t ’30′ anymore. Nothing wrong with using ‘crutches’ so we can fully participate in our lives. How is a knee wrap any different from an arch support? They are tools, not crutches. Women are so smart! -:)]

I still love that book, Born to Run.

Cheers,

FitOldDog

 Important Note: These posts do not provide medical advice. You should always consult your physician before undertaking or significantly modifying an exercise program.

Copyright © 2010 Kevin T. Morgan aka FitOldDog, Old Dogs in Training, LLC.

Post Footer automatically generated by wp-posturl plugin for wordpress.

Posted in Older Athlete, Running | Tagged , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Ants Who Stop To Reflect On The Meaning Of Life?

 

Hi folks, welcome to another lovely day!

Sometimes I wonder why I do what I do, like blogging, for instance, and then I remember, it’s all explained in this little movie I had fun making today.

Happy Trails. 

FitOldDog

 Important Note: These posts do not provide medical advice. You should always consult your physician before undertaking or significantly modifying an exercise program.

Copyright © 2010 Kevin T. Morgan aka FitOldDog, Old Dogs in Training, LLC.

Post Footer automatically generated by wp-posturl plugin for wordpress.

Posted in philosophy | Tagged | Leave a comment

A Blog Style For All? For Melinda And Marsha, Anyway! Of Eyeballs, Stents, And Learning

I believe in dog bumper sticker.

My philosophy/religion: If I can’t see it, smell it, feel it, hear it, or in other ways sense it, with or without sophisticated external equipment, I don’t take it seriously. I can see, hear, feel, and most certainly smell, my dogs. Photo by FitOldDog.

Hi folks, welcome!

Everything you learn will come in useful one day, so learn lots of interesting things, which means explore your world.

FitOldDog's article on aspirin lysinate

FitOldDog learned about aspirin, even publishing one short article on the topic (well, the lysinate), years ago.

But first, a general note on this blog:

I was becoming disenchanted with my blog the other day. The muses were absent and traffic continued to be too flat. So I posed a question concerning the value of my blog, on Facebook, receiving two contradictory responses (for which I am extremely grateful):

Melinda: The blogging market just seems to be flooded. I work full time, train a lot and have little time. I tend to read things that are short and sharp.”

Marsha:  “I enjoy reading your blogs, very philosophical as you pose age-old questions and provide your analysis and summary.”

Karen, Feldenkrais instructor, with Mr. Bones and AAA stent graft.

FitOldDog has an abdominal aortic aneurysm stent graft, as demonstrated here by Karen, his Feldenkrais instructor, and Mr. Bones. If I get clots in my stent, I could end up in a wheel chair, so I use mild anti-clotting therapy, aspirin and fish oil, as recommended by my doctors and myself. Photo by FitOldDog.

Conclusion:

For a while, I’ll try to provide a blog for which the intended message can be (a) gleaned from the pictures and their legends alone, whilst (b) the detailed version of my story will lie in the narrative. You can look at the pictures, and/or read the writing.

On with today’s narrative!

For some reason, I took up photography in my early teens, for which I worked on a farm and in a local hotel part-time to raise the funds, and I loved it. A mixture of art, chemistry, and imagination. I had no idea that many years later, the art and science of photography would play a major role in my career. For instance, in 1981, when I was a young and inexperienced scientist, I started a new job in a wonderful institute (since killed by politics) in Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.

FitOldDog's eye bleed.

Classic sub-conjunctival hemorrhage, due to allergy (-> rubbing eyes) combined with excessive inhibition of platelet function, resulting from combining aspirin with fish oil, in FitOldDog’s case. Action: stop the fish oil, as aspirin is probably sufficient protection for my stent graft. Attractive selfie by FitOldDog.

I was hired by an excellent scientist, but I could tell that I was under observation. I could almost hear him thinking: “Is this guy, Morgan, going to work out? Is he really any good, or did I make a mistake hiring him?”

I was given the job as a researcher, but when I asked the head of research what he would like me to investigate, he replied with a smile, “Anything you like, Kevin, but it had better be good!” It was music to my ears.

For the first few weeks I floundered around, wondering where to start, with the world of Chemical Toxicology as my own personal oyster. Then, passing my bosses door one day, he called me in, and handed me two boxes of microscope slides, saying, “Kevin, these two old studies have never been written up, but they contain brain lesions, and you’re a neuropathologist, so maybe you can do something with them? Here you go, see what you can do.”

Drawing of monocular microscope.

A monocular microscope, just like the one FitOldDog had as a teenager in the 1950s, in Bristol, England. Then I became a pathologist, using microscopes for a living. Image generated from a photo using Alien Skin software, by FitOldDog.

It turned out that the researchers involved in the generation of these tissue sections had completed the studies, and then left the Institute. They had abandoned the data to disappear into the archives. But my boss had different ideas. It was clearly a test of this new guy. I took the slides to a microscope and did what I did best: I explored. Fascinating finding awaited me. Within three weeks I had generated a data set as tables, combined with a number of descriptive figures. The photos were black and white prints, and as I didn’t have any direct technical support at the time, I went into the darkroom (boy, what a darkroom, it was like wonderland), and with a little orientation from the staff on the use of this sophisticated gear, I printed my photographs for publication. No big deal, as I was very used to photographic enlargers, and dishes of developer and fixative, from my teenage years. I glazed the prints, and carried them out of the darkroom in a stack, and who should I bump into but my new boss.

Airmail paper.

Airmail paper, another lesson learned by FitOldDog years before – moral, never lie, but work the system, especially if your boss won’t listen to reason. After many drafts and shortenings, I used airmail paper to trick my boss into thinking I’d shortened my paper yet again – but it was only lighter – we laughed about it over a beer once it was published and I revealed my secret. But that’s another story (now my legends are turning into essays! Apologies to Melinda!).

He looked at me, and my stack of prints, and said, “Well, Kevin, what have you got there, and who printed them for you?” I showed him the prints, and explained that I was quite comfortable in a photographic darkroom, to which he was openly surprised as it wasn’t mentioned in my resume. Later that day I placed a draft manuscript on his desk.

What I learned as a kid for fun earned me the trust and respect of my new colleagues over 20 years later. This turned out to be true for a number of other hobbies I developed, including swimming (water polo), cycling (touring), canoeing (I built one), French (loved it), Computer Science (couldn’t believe it), Biology (loved examining pond water from early childhood) and writing (I read everything I could lay my hands on as a youngster, and I think that it now helps my writing).

I sure wish that the high schools of today were designed to teach kids a love of learning, instead of focusing on grades, and that they fostered a desire for an active life of sport into old age, instead of just obsessing about winning (a minor component of sport, in my opinion).

Cheers,

FitOldDog

Beware those pills, my friends:

Pills

 Important Note: These posts do not provide medical advice. You should always consult your physician before undertaking or significantly modifying an exercise program.

Copyright © 2010 Kevin T. Morgan aka FitOldDog, Old Dogs in Training, LLC.

Post Footer automatically generated by wp-posturl plugin for wordpress.

Posted in blogging ideas, blogging issues, Exercise Tips, Feldenkrais, philosophy | Tagged , , , , , | 3 Comments

FitOldDog’s Cabbage Theory Of Gods And Plantar Fasciitis

William Prowse IV (left) and FitOldDog (right).

Who would you trust for advice on the treatment of plantar fasciitis, William Prowse IV (left) or FitOldDog (right). FitOldDog says you can trust both of us!!! Was William Farm Boy in The Princess Bride? I think so; my favorite movie.

Hi folks, welcome!

The Best Defense Against Injury Is Your Mind figure with SpeedPlay Pedals

Sore knees on the bike? Body awareness will lead you to pedals with plenty of float.

Setting up a business isn’t about making money, it’s about making a difference, but you do need some money to keep making a difference.

When I was growing up, or becoming conscious (not conscious in the way Eckhart Tolle means, as that came much later), our mother professed to be a Jehovah’s Witness. I remember her going around knocking on doors with copies of WatchTower and Awake, with us kids in tow. I never did get what she was talking about. I’ve always needed more concrete evidence of the existence of things, including the existence of so-called gods or God. Never made any sense to me. If I have a religion at all, it is the firm belief (not that I ascribe to the concept belief in the absence of evidence) that I don’t know what is going on in this wonderful universe of ours, and nor does anyone else, whatever they say or rant, but it is extremely interesting.

FitOldDog's treatment for plantar fasciitis e-book.I did notice that people talk a lot about their gods and God, most trying all the while to convince others of the veracity of their system of ‘belief.’ I’m not saying that they are all wrong, just that none of them make any sense to me.

About  60 years later, having retired from a career as a scientist/pathologist, I tried to sell the concept of body awareness, with little success. I subsequently chose to focus on something that really hurts, Plantar Fasciitis. I thought that this might get people’s attention, especially those with excruciatingly sore heels. I’ve been there, and it’s a royal pain in the butt. To my surprise there were many theories as to the cause of this crippling condition, and just as many approaches to treatment, if not more.

I noticed that people talk a lot about their particular opinion concerning mechanisms of, and treatment approaches to, plantar fasciitis.

This is when I came up with FitOldDog’s Cabbage Theory Of Life, that being:

If lots of people says lots of different things about a topic, many conflicting things in fact, the chances are that no one really knows what is going on with respect to the particular instance under discussion, be it gods, sore heels, or whatever.

Photo of The Plantar Fasciitis Survival Guide by William Errol Prowse IV and a Trigger Point Performance roller preferred by FitOldDog. Photo by FitOldDog.Why cabbages?

Well, I have never heard anyone, except for philosophers subscribing to extreme forms of skepticism, debate the existence versus the non-existence of cabbages – they just eat them, or they don’t, period. This leads me to suspect that cabbages may well be around, whereas the god/God and sore heel debates require something more concrete to be established – Oh! Yes! Never run on concrete, really bad for plantar fasciitis.

Conclusion: as a business proposition, plantar fasciitis could be a winner, but there is lots of competition, much of which I find unimpressive. Cabbage cluster at Boss BettyMy favorite competitor is William Prowse IV. Just watch his video and read his book, The Plantar Fasciitis Survival Guide.

Should I promote my competitors?

Only if their product is better than mine, and then I should get out of the business.

But plantar fasciitis, like religion, is a not a one size fits all sort of problem. I would prefer to work with William, to our mutual benefit and that of our respective customers. I compared and contrasted our products in a previous post, which William said he appreciated. Thank you William – I wonder what I, II and III were like? You can find our products here:

The Plantar Fasciitis Survival Guide.

FitOldDog’s Treatment For Plantar Fasciitis.

What I really want is for people to listen when I tell them about the wonders of the study of Body Awareness – best of luck, FitOldDog, in this 140 character, take a pill, world of ours!

Don’t worry, I won’t give up.

Cheers,

Kevin aka FitOldDog

 Important Note: These posts do not provide medical advice. You should always consult your physician before undertaking or significantly modifying an exercise program.

Copyright © 2010 Kevin T. Morgan aka FitOldDog, Old Dogs in Training, LLC.

Post Footer automatically generated by wp-posturl plugin for wordpress.

Posted in plantar fasciitis, psychology | Tagged , , , , | 23 Comments

Blog Of The Week: “Just Live Your Own Life,” Which Is Not So Easy As You Might Think!

Buster

Click image for link to Marsha’s blog.

Hi folks, welcome!

I decided to bring your attention to one of my most dedicated followers, mentors, and guides, Marsha, who loves lost animals and history, and authors an excellent blog, “Just Live Your Own Life.”

Hotel from Marsha's BlogWhat I find most alluring about Marsha’s writing is that it calms me down. I’m not naturally a nervous person, but I am a bit driven, or even OCD. In spite of my daily meditation, I can still become bent out of shape by things that seem crazy and are out of my control. Not like the Middle East, about which I’m concerned, but crazy family stuff. Then I read some of Marsha’s writing, one of her comments on my blog or a history lesson on Facebook, and I immediately want to give up eating meat and get my life in perspective.

Maybe if lots of you comment on Marsha’s blog, we shall be gifted with more of her excellent writing. I hope Marsha isn’t mad at me for suggesting such a thing, because I failed to ask permission as I know that Marsha is a forgiving person?

Good writing is hard to find, and even more difficult to produce.

Cheers,

Kevin aka FitOldDog

 Important Note: These posts do not provide medical advice. You should always consult your physician before undertaking or significantly modifying an exercise program.

Copyright © 2010 Kevin T. Morgan aka FitOldDog, Old Dogs in Training, LLC.

Post Footer automatically generated by wp-posturl plugin for wordpress.

Posted in blogging issues, psychology | Tagged , | 2 Comments

Aging, Health And The Value Of Regular Massage, Professional Or Self-Applied

Bob Hope

In his later years, Bob Hope had a massage therapist on his staff to massage him daily.

Hi folks, welcome!

As we get older, we become stiffer. If you want to keep yourself moving as an older adult, or find tight muscles (myofascia) before they become sports injuries, have a massage.

FitOldDog with Tara House

FitOld Dog with his friend and masseuse (and Gyrokinesis and Pilates teacher), Tara House.

Massage is extremely beneficial, but complex. I have experienced two main forms of massage, ‘fluff and buff,‘ where the goal is relaxation, and sports massage, which can be extremely painful. I like to have a massage, when I can afford one, because it locates muscle tension that I don’t even suspect.

For instance, a few days ago I had a great massage from my friend, and professional body movement expert, Tara House, with the goal of reducing tension in my right calf and for general body maintenance. My right calf has been a chronic issue for my running, but it’s slowly improving as I apply regular stretching, and roller work with my TriggerPoint Performance Roller.

The Trigger Point Performance Roller kit

Click image for link to TriggerPoint Performance Rollers.

During my massage, Tara found that my left calf was actually tighter than the problem right side – surprise, surprise. I’d put so much attention on the right that I’d neglected the left, so on the roller it went.

I’d have injured that left calf too if Tara hadn’t pointed out the problem, sure as eggs are eggs!

Finally, if you can’t afford regular massages from a skilled massage therapist, like Tara, get yourself some rollers, and do it yourself as best you can.

Preferably use a combination of professional body work and personal myofascial work for optimal performance and an active old age.

Cheers,

Kevin aka FitOldDog

 Important Note: These posts do not provide medical advice. You should always consult your physician before undertaking or significantly modifying an exercise program.

Copyright © 2010 Kevin T. Morgan aka FitOldDog, Old Dogs in Training, LLC.

Post Footer automatically generated by wp-posturl plugin for wordpress.

Posted in Exercise Tips, Older Athlete | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Does Your Dog Like Peas?

Photo of Lou 72

I met Lou in the mall, and we chatted for a few minutes before his wife ‘collected’ him. Lou turned out to be a very interesting guy, retired from IBM. Was he really a nice guy, though? I suspect so, but you have to be careful with humans. Food is different. Photo by FitOldDog with permission.

Hi folks, welcome!

Rick with Willbe

Here’s a guy I trust, my friend Rick, but I’ve known him for several years – he’s consistent, a great Dad, loves dogs and his kids, and what a swimmer. Never changes, with no pretense, but it takes a while to get used him because he’s quiet and makes no attempt to impress. Photo by FitOldDog with permission.

Why do we like one person, vegetable, book, or dog, and not another?

When it comes to liking most things, no problem, your initial impression is generally on target. For humans, however, first impressions are dangerous and you have to remember that you most certainly can’t tell a book by it’s cover when it comes to people. The initial persona can be a complete deception, but it comes out in the end. Another important issue is that some people can read through the deception immediately – I’m not one of those people, it takes me a while, so I listen to those who can. It’s uncanny how they do that.

Our dogs, seem to have no doubt about who or what they like, and they make no bones about it. For instance, our little dog, Scooter, will ignore most dogs, but then out of the blue he takes exception to a particular dog, and goes nuts, acting like a big aggressive attack dog.

Willbe looking at a piece of cheese

Cheese?

Our yellow lab, Willbe, on the other hand, wants to play with all dogs EXCEPT when Scooter doesn’t like them, and then he joins in. He liked them until his friend Scooter didn’t!!! It would appear that mammals, including humans and dogs, are fickle and easily misled.

We like this and we don’t like that, right off the bat, but we can be persuaded against initial impressions, or our best interests, sometimes, by the reactions of others. Dog or human!! I often wonder about this stuff, and how I’ve been led astray in the past.

That said, I can’t get my dogs to like peas. In fact, I’ve never found a dog that will eat peas. Willbe eating cheeseAll the dogs I’ve known can pick the peas out of a stew, and leave them all cleaned up on the side of their plate.

Cheese is another story.

I’m yet to meet a dog that doesn’t like cheese.

I often wonder why I like this food and not that one, or this person and not the other. Guess it comes down to some kind of reflection or projection of an inner image, based on one’s past experience, or that of distant ancestors, due to genetic imprints. This is surely molded by nostalgic memories, and even the immediate environment, or our mood at the time.

This is where food and humans differ. I’ve known humans I liked a lot immediately, who turned out to be less than savory in the end, whilst others who I didn’t take to at first were the salt of the earth.

I really trust Rick, but I have to reserve judgement for Lou – took me a while to learn this lesson.

You have to give it time and read past the outer shell. Willbe won’t even give peas a chance, but he’s never been deceived by a cheese.

Cheers,

Kevin aka FitOldDog

Peas

Peas, anyone?

 

 Important Note: These posts do not provide medical advice. You should always consult your physician before undertaking or significantly modifying an exercise program.

Copyright © 2010 Kevin T. Morgan aka FitOldDog, Old Dogs in Training, LLC.

Post Footer automatically generated by wp-posturl plugin for wordpress.

Posted in nutrition, psychology | Tagged | 5 Comments